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Appeal to protect the health and rights of Syrian women and girls

By Babatunde Osotimehin; Originally posted on Devex

As leaders meet for the Syrian donors conference, after five years of conflict, more than half of all Syrians have been forced to flee their homes. Over 13 million remain inside the country, and 4.7 million have crossed seas and borders in search of safety and opportunity. Among those affected are more than 5 million Syrian women and adolescent girls of reproductive age, of whom 430,000 are pregnant. Read More..

A Look Into Advocacy: January

While Women Deliver is based in New York, we often find ourselves all around the world advocating for improvement of the health, rights, and wellbeing of girls and women. The first month of 2016 has found us in places like Bali and Davos, and has assured us that the tide will continue turning for girls and women and we want to stay at the center of it. Read More...

Global Goals: It’s time to raise our sights for girls’ rights

By: Plan International; Originally posted on Thomson Reuters

With the New Year marking the official start to implementation of the sustainable development goals (SDGs), we must commit to decisive steps to transform the lives of girls, who are so often left behind, says child rights organisation Plan International. The world’s governments have committed to use the next 15 years to make sweeping development gains to end hunger, achieve gender equality, ensure sustainable use of the planet’s resources and end preventable deaths. Read More...

An End of Year Toast to Girls and Women – a Force to be Reckoned With

By: Katja Iversen
CEO, Women Deliver; Originally posted on Huffington Post


What? December already! It never ceases to amaze me how quickly a year can fly by.

But the calendar says: ‘holiday-blog’and calendars typically don't lie. So going the normal route, this is where I would sit down and write a blog that looks back, takes stock, highlights the great things Women Deliver did in 2015, wishes everyone a quiet, peaceful year-end, and encourages everybody to give an end of year donation. Read More...

Ensuring Universal Access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Services Through SDG3

By: Jennifer Amadi, Women Deliver Young Leader

Young women in Nigeria are caught between tradition and a shifting cultural landscape, brought about by urbanization, globalized economies, and a media-saturated environment. Many young women are unprepared to face the challenges that accompany limited access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including forced child birth, banishment from the community, infections, and even death. Read more....

Reducing Maternal Deaths in Nigeria: How Men Can Play a Critical Role During Pregnancy

By: Nnamdi Eseme, Women Deliver Young Leader

In Nigeria, women have always been forced to go through the stressful journey of pregnancy all alone, with little or no support from their husbands. This makes them susceptible to psychological stress, anxiety, fear, and complications during pregnancy. According to the World Health Organization, conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth constitute the second leading causes of death among women of reproductive age, after HIV/AIDS. Every year, there are 303,000 maternal deaths worldwide. Read More... 

Women Deliver’s Young Leaders Program Named Top Model Youth Leadership Program


At Women Deliver, we believe that the health and rights of young people are a priority. They are powerful spokespeople for their own needs and agents of change who can transform policies, programs, and communities for the better. Across the globe, young people are driving social progress and directly influencing the sustainability and resilience of their communities and nations. Read more...

Celebrate Solutions: Securing Women’s Land Rights in Rwanda

By: Brittany Tatum, Women Deliver

It was not until 1999 that women gained the right to own land in Rwanda. As a country with one of the highest population densities in Africa, Rwandan land is a valuable commodity. Even though women now have the right to own land, almost 80 percent of women in rural areas of Rwanda do not know their property rights. For those who do, customary laws can still undermine their right to inherit land. These disparities have not gone unnoticed. There are some notable organizations in Rwanda helping women learn about and enforce their land rights. Read More...

Keeping our promise to 120 million women and girls

By: Melinda Gates; Originally posted on Devex

Let’s begin with a hard truth: unplanned pregnancy is for many a matter of life and death. Every two minutes a woman dies due to pregnancy-related complications — a grim transformation of what should be one of the happiest times into one of the most dangerous. Read More...

 

Why Investing in Women and Girls Makes Economic Sense

By: Mandy Moore; Originally Posted on ONE

I woke up in India’s capital of Delhi and piled into a car for an hour’s drive down unpaved muddy roads, through crowded streets where stagnant sewage water filled the lanes between buildings and houses. This was the most recent trip of many I’ve taken as an advocate for the health and rights of girls and women in the developing world as a global ambassador for Population Services International (PSI). Read More...  

Heed past lessons to deliver for girls and women – and drive progress for all

By: Jill Sheffield; Originally Posted on Thomson Reuters 

There was a lot on the line for the world’s girls and women last week as global leaders meet at UN headquarters for a once-in-a-generation summit on international development. Last time around, 15 years ago, I was there – and it didn’t turn out so well for girls and women. We’re more optimistic today, with the UN Secretary-General and many global leaders personally pledging to make the Sustainable Development Goals work for girls and women. Read More...

 

Education and Health: the Spandrels to Build a Gender Equal World

By: Graca Machel and Dr. Mark Dybul; Originally Posted on: Huffington Post 

This year, as students return to school, we should think about young people as individuals, rather than as issues. For any individual woman to gain equal opportunity, what would she need as a girl? Education and health. Intertwining education and health can ensure that girls not only survive, but thrive and reach their full potential. Separately, education and health are important for every girl. Linked together, they could change the world. Read More...

Time to Make the new Sustainable Development Goals Matter Most for Girls and Women

By: Katja Iversen & Brittany Tatum, Women Deliver

Imagine a world where no woman dies giving life, where no baby is born with HIV, where every girl is able to attend school and get a quality education, and where everybody—and that includes girls and women —can fulfill their potential and help accelerate progress for all. That world is within reach —and it is time for global action. Read More...

Is Investing in Nutrition the Key to Achieving the Global Goals?

By: Brittany Tatum; Originally Posted on Global Citizen

There are an estimated 795 million people in the world who don’t have enough food to lead a healthy, active life. That’s 1 out of 9 experiencing malnutrition, sometimes with devastating outcomes. Malnutrition contributes to roughly half of the 8.8 million child deaths per year. According to the World Health Organization, malnutrition is the biggest trigger for multiple diseases and risk factors, including stunted growth, obesity-related conditions, and iron-deficiency anemia. However, there are actions that can improve nutrition and the health of girls and women. Read More...

A Win for Women and Girls; Now Words Must Become Action

Originally Posted on IPPF

The governments of the world have committed to making sure that every girl and woman can live free from discrimination and have access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights within one generation. When implemented, this agenda will save millions of lives. Read More...

Turning Ideas Into Action

By: Brittany Tatum, Women Deliver 

How do we turn ideas into action? That has been the question on everyone’s mind during Clinton Global Initiative’s Week of Action. From 9 July to 17 July, change-makers from across sectors met to discuss new and proven solutions within a range of challenges. On 16 July gender equality was put on the table, and five experts that make it their mission to invest in girls and women met on a panel called “Inclusion to Equality: Amplifying the Contributions of Girls and Women”. Read More...

Why you should think twice about ignoring women’s sports

By: Katja Iversen; Originally Posted on Women in the World 

If money talks, then the Women’s World Cup was a whisper at best. After Team USA’s win over Japan in the final last Sunday, the shocking disparity between women’s and men’s World Cup winnings has been thrown into sharp focus. To add insult to injury, FIFA’s financial statements relegate the Women’s World Cup to “other FIFA events.” Read More...

 

Girls in sport: More and better research needed to level the playing field

By Flavie Halais; Originally posted on Devex 

The movement to use sports as a catalyst for improving the lives of girls and women is growing, but what’s the evidence that supports the various benefits and uses of sports? And what kind of additional research is needed to help development professionals design smarter programs?

Researchers and practitioners who gathered at the Girl Power in Play Symposium, held last month in Ottawa, Canada, weighed in on how we can help build a better case for the role sports can play in the post-2015 agenda. Read More...

#GirlsCan Campaign Scores For Health at the FIFA Women’s World Cup

By: Anna Dirksen, PSI Consulation; Originally Posted on PSI

The United States faces off against Japan this Sunday in the long awaited final round of the FIFA Women’s World Cup. With both teams ranked in the top four before heading into the tournament, there’s no telling which country will walk away victorious. The only sure winner this weekend will be a team of players who will never actually step onto the pitch: #GirlsCan. Read More...

Girls’ Participation in Sports: What We Know and What We Need to Know

By: Martha Brady, Population Council 

This month Canada is hosting the largest and most diverse Women’s World Cup tournament in history. With 24 teams (up from 16 in 2011), hundreds of players, and tens of thousands of fans from across the globe, the 2015 Women’s World Cup clearly illustrates the extraordinary growth in women’s sports. In addition to the expected teams from Europe, England, Canada, the United States, Japan, China, and Australia, exciting and powerful teams from low and middle income countries have been performing on this world stage. Nigeria, Cote d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Ecuador, Korea, among others, have played to record crowds in stadiums throughout Canada. Read More...

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