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Katja Iversen Joins World Bank’s Civil Society Consultative Group for Health, Nutrition & Population

It is with great excitement that Women Deliver’s CEO, Katja Iversen, has been selected for the World Bank’s Civil Society Consultative Group for Health, Nutrition and Population as a new member. Established in 2011, the Group provides a structured way for Civil Society Organizations to contribute to, influence and share information, lessons learned, and advice on the development of World Bank Group plans, policies and programs in health, nutrition and population (HNP) in low- and middle-income countries. The Group consists of 16 civil society experts from both national and international organizations on issues related to HNP in different regions. Members serve on a voluntary basis for three years. Read more...

Arts in Advocacy: How to Touch Minds and Hearts for Action and Change

By Katja Iversen; Originally posted on Devex

I will never forget the evening in 2009 when I heard Sean, a 19-year-old spoken-word artist from Brooklyn, New York, give a performance about women dying during pregnancy or childbirth in Sierra Leone; it left me in tears. Read more...

15 Journalists, 15 Voices for Girls and Women

March 5, 2015, New York, NY – To celebrate International Women’s Day (March 8), Women Deliver is honoring 15 journalists for their consistent and game-changing coverage of maternal, sexual and reproductive health and rights issues at the global and national levels. Read more...

Jill Sheffield To Speak at the 8th Annual Family of Woman Film Festival

On February 24th, Women Deliver Founder & President, Jill Sheffield will be a featured speaker at the Family of Woman Film Festival’s Bonni Curran Memorial Lecture on the Health and Dignity of Women. The festival was founded by Peggy Elliot Goldwyn in 2008 to bring attention to the issues confronting women and girls around the world – issues that are at the heart of Women Deliver’s mission. Read more...

Ending Child Marriage in Malawi: A Roadmap to Sustainable Change

By: Emily Teistworth, Director of Programs, Let Girls Lead; Originally posted on Huffington Post

Malawi outlawed child marriage last week. Following more than five years of undaunted advocacy by Malawian girls, their allies and civil society leaders, the country's Parliament tabled and passed the "Marriage, Divorce, and Family Relations Bill," increasing the legal age of marriage from 15 to 18 years. This legal victory is a huge step forward for girls' and women's rights globally. The fact that it has been a painfully slow step merely serves to underscore its vital importance. Read more...

Innovative and Exciting Young Leaders Program Opens for New Applicants

January 15, 2015, New York, NY – Women Deliver announces the opening of the application process for their new Young Leaders Program (YLP). The YLP is a three-year fellowship opportunity for young people under the age of 30 who are working to advance the health, rights, and well-being of girls and women around the world. Read more...

Most Girls In Her Village Don’t Finish Elementary School. Maureen Graduated From College.

By: Women Deliver and Maureen Oduor

Women Deliver eagerly celebrates the gradtion of one of our Young Leaders, Maureen Oduor, who received her Bachelors degree Kampala International University in December. Rather than shining the spotlight on herself, Maureen took the opportunity to use her graduation celebration as a platform to bring local and international light to the issue of education accessibility and the need for girls’ access to schooling. This is her story. Read more...

Celebrate Solutions: Finding the Beauty in Education

By: Melissa Hattab, Women Deliver

Every girl deserves an education, and one major American magazine is joining the global campaign to prioritize the education of at-risk girls all over the world. Glamour magazine has collaborated with four nonprofits to raise money for girls to help them attend secondary school.

Cindi Leive, Glamour’s editor in chief, said that the magazine started The Girl Project in part because of recent world events, including the girls kidnapped from their school in Nigeria and the many schools damaged in Gaza. Read more..

The Gift That Keeps Giving and Benefits Us All

By: Jill Sheffield and Katja Iversen, Women Deliver

The holidays are upon us, and with that an opportune time to reflect on what we have, what we want, what has happened over the past year, and what will come in the next.

2014 was, in many ways, a good year for those advocating for the health, rights and wellbeing of girls and women. We saw more women gaining access to contraception, a continued momentum to ensure girls and women are prioritized in the post-2015 agenda, and an inclusion of human rights and involvement of young people included in the Secretary General’s draft synthesis report on the Sustainable Development Goals. However, we also saw conservative forces chipping away on sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world, and it is clear that there is still much work to be done. Read more...

Women Deliver Joins Coalition for First-Ever Universal Health Coverage Day

Today marks the first-ever Universal Health Coverage Day, and Women Deliver is proud to show our support as part of a coalition of 535 organizations from 103 countries around the world. Universal Health Coverage day marks the two-year anniversary of the United Nations resolution which endorsed universal health coverage as a pillar of sustainable development and global security. This day is intended to underscore the critical need for universal access to health services for the 1 billion people worldwide who are not able to access the care they need. Read more...

Lancet Series Sheds a Light on Gender-Based Violence

Last week, The Lancet published a special series on violence against women and girls to highlight the devastating impact of gender-based violence on the world, and how these acts of violence can be best prevented. Within the series, five papers cover the evidence base for interventions, discuss the vital role of the health sector in care and prevention, show the need for men and women to be involved in effective programs, provide practical lessons from experience in countries, and present a call for action with five key recommendations and indicators to track progress. Read more...

The Struggle for Our Dignity

By: Nebila Abdulmelik, Women Deliver Young Leader

As reports and videos emerged of women being stripped naked in public in both Kenya and Tanzania, activists and citizens of conscience began organizing around a campaign, #MyDressMyChoice which was also trending online. A protest was organized on November 17, in which hundreds of us took to the streets to protest the indignity and the violence that was faced by the women, as well as the affront to personal safety, security and choice. Read more...

Improving SRHR Outcomes For Youth In Uganda Is Within Our Reach

These seed grants were funded by Johnson & Johnson and WomanCare Global via the Women Deliver C Exchange Youth Initiative.

By: Wanzala E. Martin, Allied Youth Initiative – Uganda

In a bid to take the quest for improved sexual & reproductive health (SRH) outcomes for young people a notch higher, Allied Youth Initiative - Uganda (AYI - Uganda) conceived the Better-Quality Access for Youth (BAY) project idea to scale-up and deepen engagement around the issue. We have worked with partner organizations across the country over the last six months to advocate for meaningful investments in youth-focused SRH programs as a means to accelerate progress towards achieving the country’s local and international development targets by 2015. Through this initiative, we specifically targeted a diverse group of young people ages 15-30. Read more...

Why Are Women and Children Still Dying?

By: Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, Founder and Executive Director, Let Girls Lead, Champions for Change, and Youth Champions Initiative; Originally posted by

Nigeria, one of the richest countries in Africa, also boasts one of the world’s highest rates of maternal, newborn, and child death.  One in 13 Nigerian women dies during pregnancy or childbirth, and one in 8 Nigerian children dies before their fifth birthday.

And Nigeria is not alone. The global realities are equally devastating – nearly three million newborn babies die annually, and 800 women die in childbirth every single day. That means that two women will die by the time you finish reading this article – assuming you read fast. Read more...

Stand Up and Be Counted: How the Data Revolution Strengthens Advocacy

By: Joanna Hoffman, Women Deliver

At first glance, data might not seem particularly political or rights-based. But beyond the numbers and graphs, key questions emerge: Who is and isn’t counted? Who decides this? How can we track the data on issues we care about? And once we have the data we need, how can we then translate it into impactful advocacy tools so that partners worldwide, regardless of resources, can drive progress? Read more...

Raising Youth Voices to Stop Child Marriage and Dowry in Bangladesh

These seed grants were funded by Johnson & Johnson and WomanCare Global via the Women Deliver C Exchange Youth Initiative.

By: SM Shaikat, SERAC-Bangladesh

The title of my project - “Jagoroni” - means rising. This rising is to prevent two major disparities and human rights violations in Bangladesh society - child marriage and dowry. The plan was to engage youth to lead this rising, and Women Deliver’s C Exchange Youth Initiative became our opportunity to start.

I wanted to train young people so they could become change agents in their communities and, as a group, these volunteers were named as “Jagori,” meaning wakeful. The project was aimed to develop a watchdog group of young people that will be on the lookout for dowry violence and child marriage issues in Mymensingh, the district that has the highest rate of dowry cases in Bangladesh. Read more...

Can Young People End Child Marriage?

These seed grants were funded by Johnson & Johnson and WomanCare Global via the Women Deliver C Exchange Youth Initiative.

By: Yemurai Nyoni, Bulawayo Youth Development Organization (Zimbabwe)

I remember the words of the Minister of Health from Zimbabwe on the sidelines of ICASA 2013, when I told him about the Rising Birds Project. He said, “I’d like to see how you plan to end child marriage in Zimbabwe, it’s a deeply complicated issue…” His response was devoid of excitement and, to me, it sounded more like a challenge to justify our project’s optimistic goal of ending the practice, which had taken hundreds of generations to establish, in just seven months. Read more...

 

Why Sexual Rights Are Important

These seed grants were funded by Johnson & Johnson and WomanCare Global via the Women Deliver C Exchange Youth Initiative.

By: Chukwudera Bridget Okeke, Concern Women International Development Initiative (Nigeria)

My project, the Concern Women International Development Initiative, seeks to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS among female sex workers (FSW) and their clients in Benue State Nigeria. To do this, we trained FSWs to be peer educators, conducted interpersonal communication capacity-building to reach clients of FSW and non-brother-based FSW, held sensitization workshops on FSW-friendly services for 10 private providers, and translated informational and educational materials on HIV and STIs into local dialects. Read more...

Working with Young People to Have Their Say in the Post-2015 Development Dialogue

Originally posted by UNAIDS

Today’s generation of young people is the largest in history, with 1.8 billion adolescents and youth making up one quarter of the world’s population. Young people have a critical role in ensuring that political momentum to achieve the end of the AIDS epidemic and to secure specific targets around sexual and reproductive health and rights in the post-2015 development agenda is sustained. Read more...

On The March Towards Improved SRHR Outcomes For Youth In Uganda Through Think-And-Thin

These seed grants were funded by Johnson & Johnson and WomanCare Global via the Women Deliver C Exchange Youth Initiative.

By: Wanzala E. Martin, Allied Youth Initiative – Uganda

Since March 2014, the Allied Youth Initiative – Uganda (AYI-Uganda) has been working with partner organizations across the country to increase investments in youth-focused sexual and reproductive health (SRH) programs as a means to accelerate progress towards achieving the country’s local and international development targets by 2015. The goal of AYI Uganda’s “Better-Quality Access for Youth” (BAY) project is to gather as many as one million youth voices in support of reproductive rights through online platforms, essay competitions, and street interviews and then petition the Ugandan Speaker of Parliament to ensure adequate investment in youth SRH education and services. Read more...

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