News

Updates


Andean Nations Unite to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

This past week, a diverse group of stakeholders from six countries- Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Columbia and Venezuela-  joined together to celebrate Andean Week for Teen Pregnancy Prevention. This event brings together youth organizations and government bodies in collaboration with partners from the Andean Plan to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (PLANEA) in a series of activities and interactive events. With the aim of reaching communities and policy-makers, these activities are designed to raise awareness about the issue of teen pregnancy and what can be done to scale-up prevention efforts. Read more...

World Contraception Day: Family Planning is More Than Smart Economics

By: Jill Sheffield, President of Women Deliver and Elisabeth van der Steenhoven, Director of WO=MEN, Dutch Gender Platform

In just a few weeks, the world’s population will surpass seven billion. This intimidating figure should be a critical reminder to all of us—especially advocates and donor countries—of a promise we have yet to deliver on: ensuring access to family planning for women around the world. Read more...

World Contraception Day: Let’s Use Social Media

Get Involved: Add Your Own Perspectives At The Conversations For A Better World Blog Series

By: Bridget Akudo Nwagbara, Chair of the Youth Health Workers Advocates, Nigeria – MNCH

Social media has revolutionized the way people across the globe interact with one another. At the recent, the Social Good Summit, initiatives like Shot@Life, which was launched with the intent to leverage online communities to deliver health care to marginalized and vulnerable populations, were lauded. Young people are leading this revolution! And as such, they should be the target of more initiatives that use social media. Read more...

World Contraception Day: The Importance of Educating Young Women

Get Involved: Add Your Own Perspectives At The Conversations For A Better World Blog Series

By: Saba Ismail, one of the Women Deliver 100 Young Leaders and program manager of the “Sahailee Hotline”

In Pakistan, talking about sexual and reproductive health, sexuality and contraception is considered taboo. The truth is, Pakistan is a conservative country and the people here have feudal norms and culture. Young people cannot talk about contraception nor discuss it with their friends – when they do, they are considered vulgar. They’re not allowed to ask questions about topics like contraception because their use is considered a sin, and some doctors won’t give their patients permission to use contraception because they consider it anti-Islamic. According many people’s religious beliefs, women shouldn’t use contraception because children are “a gift from God” and we should not reject such a precious gift. The only way doctors recommend that husbands and wives stop having children is by avoiding intercourse altogether – they make no mention of modern contraception. People here believe that if someone does not want to produce children, they should just avoid intercourse. Read more...

World Contraception Day: Silence is Damaging

Get Involved: Add Your Own Perspectives At The Conversations For A Better World Blog Series

By: Hasinihaja Tsiaro Barijaona Raharison, one of the Women Deliver 100 Young Leaders and an Oxfam Action Partner

In Madagascar, there remains a lack of information about contraception. Myths and misconceptions surrounding contraceptive use are common among young people, and confusion and ignorance has led to incorrect or low use of modern contraceptive methods and high amounts of concern about contraceptive side effects. Myths persist, including stories that modern contraceptive methods are responsible for infertility and that taking a bath or shower after sex, rinsing a woman’s vagina with soda, or taking inappropriate pills after sex are effective at stopping unwanted pregnancies. Read more...

 1 2 3 >  Last ›

 

Women Deliver 

588 Broadway, Suite 905
New York, NY 10012 USA

Tel: +1.646.695.9100
Fax: + 1 646.695.9145

Email: info [at] womendeliver.org

 
 

Join the
Mailing List

Click here to join the mailing list.